91 Incredible (Evidence-Based) Breastfeeding Stats

This is the ultimate collection of 91 evidence-based breastfeeding statistics.

For breastfeeding advocates, it is a powerful resource providing compelling facts at your fingertips.

For everyone else (skeptics included), the following data demonstrates exactly why breastfeeding and human milk is considered the “normative standards” for infant feeding and nutrition.

This is backed up by the World Health Organization, UNICEF, and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Given the documented short- and long-term medical and neurodevelopmental advantages of breastfeeding, infant nutrition should be considered a public health issue and not only a lifestyle choice. (AAP)

Each statistic is sourced from credible peer-reviewed journals or other notable authorities. These are noted alongside each stat so that you can verify the data and where it comes from.


Breast feeding RECOMMENDED PRACTICE

  • 1 hour – Ideally, infants should be breastfed within one hour of birth
    SOURCE: UNICEF
    URL: data.unicef.org/topic/nutrition/infant-and-young-child-feeding
  • 6 months – Mothers are advised to exclusively breastfeeding for the first six months
    SOURCE: The American Academy of Pediatrics
    URL: pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/129/3/e827
  • 1 year – Mothers are advised by the AAP to continue breastfeeding for at least a year and beyond for as long as mutually desired by mother and child
    SOURCE: The American Academy of Pediatrics
    URL: pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/129/3/e827
  • 2 years – The WHO and UNICEF go further than the AAP and recommend continued breastfeeding for the first two years and beyond for as long as mutually desired by mother and child
    SOURCE: UNICEF
    URL: data.unicef.org/topic/nutrition/infant-and-young-child-feeding
  • 8 to 12 times – Infants should normally be breastfed 8 to 12 times per day
    SOURCE: The American Academy of Pediatrics
    URL: pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/129/3/e827
  • 3 to 4 weeks – Pacifiers should not be offered to infants any earlier than 3 to 4 weeks (unless there is a medical reason to do so)
    SOURCE: The American Academy of Pediatrics
    URL: pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/129/3/e827



Breastfeeding world map

Breastfeeding rates by state and country

  • 79% of US moms initiate breastfeeding
    SOURCE: Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP)
    URL: healthypeople.gov/2020/data-search/Search-the-Data?nid=4859
  • 19% of US moms exclusively breastfeed for 6 months
    SOURCE: Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP)
    URL: healthypeople.gov/2020/data-search/Search-the-Data#objid=4863
  • 26% of US moms are doing any breastfeeding at 1 year
    SOURCE: Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP)
    URL: healthypeople.gov/2020/data-search/Search-the-Data#objid=4861
  • 19% of US babies are given formula within 2 days
    SOURCE: Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP)
    URL: healthypeople.gov/2020/data-search/Search-the-Data#objid=4865
  • 40% – Globally, only 40% of infants under six months of age are exclusively breastfed
    SOURCE: World Health Organization
    URL: who.int/news-room/facts-in-pictures/detail/breastfeeding
  • US Breastfeeding Rates (lowest and highest by state)

    SOURCE: Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP)
    URL: healthypeople.gov/2020/data-search/Search-the-Data#objid=4859
  • US Exclusive to 6-months Breastfeeding Rates (lowest and highest by state)
    Exclusive BF rates stats
    SOURCE: Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP)
    URL: healthypeople.gov/2020/data-search/Search-the-Data#objid=4863
  • US Any Breastfeeding at 1-Year Rates (lowest and highest by state)
    BF rates at 1 year
    SOURCE: Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP)
    URL: healthypeople.gov/2020/data-search/Search-the-Data#objid=4861
  • US Breastfeeding Rates by Age
    BF stats by age
    SOURCE: Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP)
    URL: healthypeople.gov/2020/data-search/Search-the-Data#objid=4859
  • US Breastfeeding Rates by EducationBF stats by education
    SOURCE: Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP)
    URL: healthypeople.gov/2020/data-search/Search-the-Data#objid=4859
  • US Breastfeeding Rates by Income
    BF stats by family income
    SOURCE: Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP)
    URL: healthypeople.gov/2020/data-search/Search-the-Data#objid=4859
  • Globally Breastfeeding Rate (any)
    BF rates by country
    SOURCE: UNICEF
    URL: data.unicef.org/topic/nutrition/infant-and-young-child-feeding/
  • Globally Breastfeeding Rate (at 1 year)
    BF stats country 1 year
    SOURCE: UNICEF
    URL: data.unicef.org/topic/nutrition/infant-and-young-child-feeding/



Breastfeeding child health

Child health & intelligence benefits

  • 36% – Breastfed babies have a 36% lower risk of SIDS (when nursed for longer than one month)
    SOURCE: Ip S, Chung M, Raman G, et al., Tufts-New England Medical Center Evidence-based Practice Center. Breastfeeding and maternal and infant health outcomes in developed countries. Evid Rep Technol Assess (Full Rep). 2007;153(153):1–186 pmid:17764214PubMed
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17764214?dopt=Abstract
  • 63% – Exclusively breastfed babies have a 63% lower risk of hospitalization for an upper tract respiratory infection (when nursed for more than 6 months)
    SOURCE: Duijts L, Jaddoe VW, Hofman A, Moll HA. Prolonged and exclusive breastfeeding reduces the risk of infectious diseases in infancy. Pediatrics. 2010;126(1)
    URL: pediatrics.org/cgi/content/full/126/1/e18
  • 72% – Exclusively breastfed babies have a 72% lower risk of hospitalization for a lower tract respiratory infection (when nursed for more than 4 months)
    SOURCE: Ip S, Chung M, Raman G, et al., Tufts-New England Medical Center Evidence-based Practice Center. Breastfeeding and maternal and infant health outcomes in developed countries. Evid Rep Technol Assess (Full Rep). 2007;153(153):1–186 pmid:17764214PubMed
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17764214?dopt=Abstract
  • 40% – Breastfed babies have a 40% lower risk of developing asthma than formula fed babies (where there is a family history of Asthma)
    SOURCE: Ip S, Chung M, Raman G, et al., Tufts-New England Medical Center Evidence-based Practice Center. Breastfeeding and maternal and infant health outcomes in developed countries. Evid Rep Technol Assess (Full Rep). 2007;153(153):1–186 pmid:17764214PubMed
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17764214?dopt=Abstract
  • 64% – Breastfed babies have a 64% lower risk of Gastroenteritis
    SOURCE: Ip S, Chung M, Raman G, et al., Tufts-New England Medical Center Evidence-based Practice Center. Breastfeeding and maternal and infant health outcomes in developed countries. Evid Rep Technol Assess (Full Rep). 2007;153(153):1–186 pmid:17764214PubMed
  • 63% – Exclusively breastfed have a 63% lower risk of serious colds
    SOURCE: Ip S, Chung M, Raman G, et al., Tufts-New England Medical Center Evidence-based Practice Center. Breastfeeding and maternal and infant health outcomes in developed countries. Evid Rep Technol Assess (Full Rep). 2007;153(153):1–186 pmid:17764214PubMed
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17764214?dopt=Abstract
  • 31% – Breastfed babies have a 31% lower risk of inflammatory bowel disease
    SOURCE: Barclay AR, Russell RK, Wilson ML, Gilmour WH, Satsangi J, Wilson DC. Systematic review: the role of breastfeeding in the development of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. J Pediatr. 2009;155(3):421–426pmid:19464699
  • 24% – Breastfed babies have a 24% lower risk of obesity
    SOURCE: Ip S, Chung M, Raman G, et al., Tufts-New England Medical Center Evidence-based Practice Center. Breastfeeding and maternal and infant health outcomes in developed countries. Evid Rep Technol Assess (Full Rep). 2007;153(153):1–186 pmid:17764214PubMed
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17764214?dopt=Abstract
  • 52% – Breastfed babies have a 52% lower risk of developing celiac disease (if breastfed at the time of gluten exposure)
    SOURCE: Akobeng AK, Ramanan AV, Buchan I, Heller RF. Effect of breast feeding on risk of coeliac disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. Arch Dis Child. 2006;91(1):39–43pmid:16287899
  • 30% – Exclusively breastfed babies have a 30% lower risk of type 1 diabetes (when nursed for longer than 3 months)
    SOURCE: Ip S, Chung M, Raman G, et al., Tufts-New England Medical Center Evidence-based Practice Center. Breastfeeding and maternal and infant health outcomes in developed countries. Evid Rep Technol Assess (Full Rep). 2007;153(153):1–186 pmid:17764214PubMed
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17764214?dopt=Abstract
  • 40% – Breastfed babies have a 40% lower risk of type 2 diabetes
    SOURCE: Ip S, Chung M, Raman G, et al., Tufts-New England Medical Center Evidence-based Practice Center. Breastfeeding and maternal and infant health outcomes in developed countries. Evid Rep Technol Assess (Full Rep). 2007;153(153):1–186 pmid:17764214PubMed
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17764214?dopt=Abstract
  • 74% – The severity of RSV bronchiolitis is reduced by 74% in infants who breastfed exclusively for 4 months
    SOURCE: Nishimura T, Suzue J, Kaji H. Breastfeeding reduces the severity of respiratory syncytial virus infection among young infants: a multi-center prospective study. Pediatr Int. 2009;51(6):812–816 pmid:19419530
  • 20% – Breastfed babies have a 20% lower risk of (acute lymphocytic) leukemia (when nursed for longer than 6 months)
    SOURCE: Rudant J, Orsi L, Menegaux F, et al. Childhood acute leukemia, early common infections, and allergy: The ESCALE Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2010;172(9):1015–1027 pmid:20807738
  • 72% of hospital admissions for diarrhea preventable by breastfeeding
    SOURCE: The Lancet
    URL: thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(15)01024-7/fulltext
  • 3.4 points – Increase in IQ associated with children being breastfed
    SOURCE: The Lancet
    URL: thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(15)01024-7/fulltext



Breastfeeding mother heath benefits

Mother health benefits

  • 10% – Women who breastfeed have a 10% lower risk of cardiovascular disease (if they have had a cumulative lifetime duration of lactation greater than 12 months
    SOURCE: Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla et al. “Duration of Lactation and Risk Factors for Maternal Cardiovascular Disease.” Obstetrics and gynecology 113.5 (2009): 974–982. PMC. Web. 25 July 2018.
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2714700/
  • 4.3% – Women who breastfeed have a 4.3% lower risk of invasive breast cancer for every 12-months of cumulative lifetime breastfeeding
    SOURCE: The Lancet
    URL: thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(15)01024-7/fulltext
  • 30% – Women who breastfeed for long periods have a 30% lower risk of ovarian cancer
    SOURCE: The Lancet
    URL: thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(15)01024-7/fulltext
  • 15% – each year a mother breastfeeds she reduces her risk of type 2 diabetes by 15% For
    SOURCE: Much, Daniela et al. “Beneficial Effects of Breastfeeding in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.” Molecular Metabolism 3.3 (2014): 284–292. PMC. Web. 25 July 2018.
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3986583/



Saving lives

Each year, a large number of deaths would be prevented by adopting optimal breastfeeding practices.

Globally:

  • 823 000 child deaths prevented
    SOURCE: World Health Organization
    URL: who.int/news-room/facts-in-pictures/detail/breastfeeding
  • 20 000 maternal deaths caused by breast cancer prevented
    SOURCE: The Lancet
    URL: thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(15)01044-2/fulltext
  • 597 – For every 597 women who optimally breastfeed, one maternal or child death is prevented
    SOURCE: Bartrick MC et al “Suboptimal breastfeeding in the United States: Maternal and pediatric health outcomes and costs” PMID: 27647492
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27647492

In the USA:

  • 2605 maternal deaths prevented
    SOURCE: Bartrick MC et al “Suboptimal breastfeeding in the United States: Maternal and pediatric health outcomes and costs” PMID: 27647492
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27647492
  • 986 maternal deaths from heart disease prevented
    SOURCE: Bartrick MC et al “Suboptimal breastfeeding in the United States: Maternal and pediatric health outcomes and costs” PMID: 27647492
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27647492
  • 838 maternal deaths from breast cancer prevented
    SOURCE: Bartrick MC et al “Suboptimal breastfeeding in the United States: Maternal and pediatric health outcomes and costs” PMID: 27647492
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27647492
  • 473 maternal deaths from diabetes prevented
    SOURCE: Bartrick MC et al “Suboptimal breastfeeding in the United States: Maternal and pediatric health outcomes and costs” PMID: 27647492
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27647492
  • 735 child death prevents
    SOURCE: Bartrick MC et al “Suboptimal breastfeeding in the United States: Maternal and pediatric health outcomes and costs” PMID: 27647492
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27647492
  • 492 child SIDS deaths prevented
    SOURCE: Bartrick MC et al “Suboptimal breastfeeding in the United States: Maternal and pediatric health outcomes and costs” PMID: 27647492
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27647492



Economy

Economy & Environment

  • $302 billion – Estimated global economic loss each year from cognitive deficits (ie, people not reaching their cognitive potential and thereby contributing less to the economy). This money would be saved if every infant was breastfed until at least 6-months
    SOURCE: The Lancet
    URL: thelancet.com/action/showFullTableImage?tableId=tbl2&pii=S0140673615010442
  • $2·45 billion would be saved in the US each year through reduced treatment costs of childhood disorders if 90% of women were to exclusively breastfeed up to 6 months and continue to breastfeed up to 1 or 2 years
    SOURCE: The Lancet
    URL: thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(15)01044-2/fulltext
  • $2528 per person is spent on formula in high-income countries
    SOURCE: The Lancet
    URL: thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(15)01044-2/fulltext
  • $11.07 million was invested into advertising baby formula in the US in 2014
    SOURCE: Statista
    URL: statista.com/statistics/632044/infant-formula-ad-spend-usa/
  • $62.5 billion is the forecast for the baby formula market by 2020
    SOURCE: Statista
    URL: statista.com/statistics/719436/global-market-size-baby-formula
  • 550 million cans, 86 000 tons of metal, and 364 000 tons of paper, annually used to package formula, end up in landfills
    SOURCE: The Lancet
    URL: thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(15)01044-2/fulltext



Hospital baby

Hospital services & Breastfeeding support

In US hospitals:

  • 24% of US-born babies are delivered in “Baby-Friendly” designated hospitals or birthing centers. (These are maternity facilities that have successfully implemented the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding.)
    SOURCE: Baby Friendly USA
    URL: babyfriendlyusa.org/newsviews-pages/celebrating-500
  • 1 in 6 hospitals and birthing centers in the US are “Baby-Friendly” designated
    SOURCE: Baby Friendly USA
    URL: babyfriendlyusa.org/newsviews-pages/celebrating-500
  • 58% of hospitals erroneously advised mothers to limit suckling at the breast to a specified length of time (a practice documented to lower breastfeeding rates and duration)
    SOURCE: Dewey KG, Nommsen-Rivers LA, Heinig MJ, Cohen RJ. Risk factors for suboptimal infant breastfeeding behavior, delayed onset of lactation, and excess neonatal weight loss. Pediatrics. 2003;112(3 pt 1):607–619 pmid:12949292
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12949292
  • 41% of hospitals gave pacifiers to more than some of their newborns (a practice documented to lower breastfeeding rates and duration)
    SOURCE: Dewey KG, Nommsen-Rivers LA, Heinig MJ, Cohen RJ. Risk factors for suboptimal infant breastfeeding behavior, delayed onset of lactation, and excess neonatal weight loss. Pediatrics. 2003;112(3 pt 1):607–619 pmid:12949292
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12949292
  • 67% of US mothers receive free formula samples from their hospital or birthing center. (Such gifts are associated with shorter breastfeeding duration)
    SOURCE: The Lancet
    URL: thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(15)01044-2/fulltext
  • 24% of maternity services provide supplements of commercial infant formula as a general practice within the first 48 hours after birth
    SOURCE: The American Academy of Pediatrics
    URL: pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/129/3/e827
  • 27% of hospitals support breastfeeding mothers after discharge
    SOURCE: The American Academy of Pediatrics
    URL: pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/129/3/e827

At work and in the community:

  • 86% – Timely breastfeeding initiation is increased by 86% where mothers receive community-based interventions, including group counseling or education
    SOURCE: The Lancet
    URL: helancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(15)01044-2/fulltext
  • 20% – Exclusive breastfeeding is increased by 20% where mothers receive community-based interventions, including group counseling or education
    SOURCE: The Lancet
    URL: thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(15)01044-2/fulltext
  • 8.9% – Increase in exclusive breastfeeding when mothers receive paid-break guarantees for at least 6 months
    SOURCE: Heymann, J, Raub, A, and Earle, A. Breastfeeding policy: a globally comparative analysis. Bull World Health Organ. 2013; 91: 398–406
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24052676
  • 25% – Breastfeeding at 6 months is increased by 25% where working mothers have access to lactation rooms and receive breaks to pump
    SOURCE: Dabritz, HA, Hinton, BG, and Babb, J. Evaluation of lactation support in the workplace or school environment on 6-month breastfeeding outcomes in Yolo County, California. J Hum Lact. 2009; 25: 182–193
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19088250
  • 23% of the world’s countries meet or exceed the recommendation of 18 weeks maternity protection
    SOURCE: The Lancet
    URL: thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(15)01044-2/fulltext
  • 3:1 – For every $1 invested in creating and supporting a lactation support program (including a designated pump site that guarantees privacy, availability of refrigeration and a hand-washing facility, and appropriate mother break time) there is a $2 to $3 dollar return
    SOURCE: The American Academy of Pediatrics
    URL: pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/129/3/e827



attitudes and perceptions

Attitudes & Perceptions

  • 60% of mothers do not breastfeed for as long as they intend to
    SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    URL: cdc.gov/breastfeeding/data/facts.html
  • 50% of mothers cite insufficient milk supply as their reason for stopping breastfeeding
    SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    URL: cdc.gov/breastfeeding/data/facts.html
  • 45% of adults surveyed believe a breastfeeding mother has to give up too many habits of her lifestyle
    SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    URL: cdc.gov/breastfeeding/data/facts.html
  • 31% of mothers surveyed thought that babies ought to be fed cereal or baby food by age 3 months
    SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    URL: cdc.gov/breastfeeding/data/facts.html
  • 31% of mothers surveyed said that 1-year-olds should not be breastfed
    SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    URL: cdc.gov/breastfeeding/data/facts.html
  • 27% of mothers surveyed felt breastfeeding in public was embarrassing
    SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    URL: cdc.gov/breastfeeding/data/facts.html
  • 58% – Only 58% of Americans surveyed said they were comfortable when mothers breastfeed their babies near them in a public place
    SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    URL: cdc.gov/breastfeeding/data/facts.html
  • 13% of adults surveyed believed that mothers should not have the right to breastfeed in public
    SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    URL: cdc.gov/breastfeeding/data/facts.html
  • 70% of adults surveyed felt there should be paid maternity leave to workers
    SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    URL: cdc.gov/breastfeeding/data/facts.html



Weaning

Weaning

  • 2 to 4 years is the typical age of weaning in most traditional societies
    SOURCE: Dettwyler, KA. A time to wean: the hominid blueprint for the natural age of weaning in modern human populations. in: PS Macadam, KA Dettwyller (Eds.) Breastfeeding: biocultural perspectives. Walter de Gruyter, Inc, New York; 1995: 39–73
  • 3 to 4 years is the typical age children self-wean in societies where children are allowed to nurse “as long as they want”
    SOURCE: Katherine Dettwyler, PhD, Department of Anthropology, Texas A and M University
    URL: iamnotthebabysitter.com/the-natural-human-weaning-age/
  • 2.5 to 7 years is the natural age of human weaning based on the patterns of nonhuman primates
    SOURCE: Patricia Stuart-Macadam “Breastfeeding, Bicultural Perspectives”
    URL: taylorfrancis.com/books/9781351530743/chapters/10.4324%2F9781315081984-8
  • 7 years was not an uncommon age of weaning among Inuits recorded in a 1953 survey of various traditional tribes
    SOURCE: Beyond Toddlerhood: The Breastfeeding Relationship Continues by Priscilla Young Colletto
    URL: naturalchild.org/guest/priscilla_colletto.html


breast milk sharing

Milk Sharing

  • 654 is the estimated number of milk banks worldwide in 2016
    SOURCE: Haiden et al 2016
    URL: 2018.worldneonatology.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/INAC-Milk-Banking-World-Wide-Jean-Charles-Picaud.pdf
  • 217 is the number of milk banks in Brazil, by far the most in the world
    SOURCE: International Milk Genomics Consortium
    URL: milkgenomics.org/article/milk-banks-around-the-world/
  • 166 848 is the number of Brazilian women donated breast milk in 2014
    SOURCE: International Milk Genomics Consortium
    URL: milkgenomics.org/article/milk-banks-around-the-world/
  • $3 to $5 per ounce is the cost of human donor milk from milk banks
    SOURCE: St-Onge, Maude, Shahnaz Chaudhry, and Gideon Koren. “Donated Breast Milk Stored in Banks versus Breast Milk Purchased Online.” Canadian Family Physician 61.2 (2015): 143–146. Print.
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4325861/
  • $60 to $100 per day is the cost for an 3.6-kg baby to consume 20 ounces of milk per day purchased from a milk bank
    SOURCE: St-Onge, Maude, Shahnaz Chaudhry, and Gideon Koren. “Donated Breast Milk Stored in Banks versus Breast Milk Purchased Online.” Canadian Family Physician 61.2 (2015): 143–146. Print.
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4325861/
  • $0.50 to $2 per ounce is the lower-end cost of human donor milk from milk-sharing websites
    SOURCE: St-Onge, Maude, Shahnaz Chaudhry, and Gideon Koren. “Donated Breast Milk Stored in Banks versus Breast Milk Purchased Online.” Canadian Family Physician 61.2 (2015): 143–146. Print.
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4325861/
  • $10 to $40 per day is the lower-end cost for an 3.6-kg baby to consume 20 ounces of milk per day purchased from a milk-sharing website
    SOURCE: St-Onge, Maude, Shahnaz Chaudhry, and Gideon Koren. “Donated Breast Milk Stored in Banks versus Breast Milk Purchased Online.” Canadian Family Physician 61.2 (2015): 143–146. Print.
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4325861/
  • 77% – Study of Ohio women found that 77% new about milk-sharing, 25% had considered it, and 4% had shared-milk
    SOURCE: Keim SA et al, “Breastmilk sharing: awareness and participation among women in the Moms2Moms Study”
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25007386
  • 96.1% – Study of women who milk-shared found that 96.1% reported doing it face-to-face either with family members or at a local level with people they trusted
    SOURCE: Palmquist A, Doehler K, “Human milk sharing practices in the U.S”
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26607304
  • 54 000 – Estimated number of currently active members on Only the Breast, the world’s most popular milk-sharing website
    SOURCE: Al Jazeera
    URL: america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/3/24/dangers-of-buying-human-breast-milk-online.html
  • 75% – Although anonymous milk-sharing with unscreened strangers is less common, it does happen. One study found 75% breast milk samples purchased online in this way exhibited high overall bacterial growth and frequent contamination with pathogenic bacteria, reflecting poor collection, storage, or shipping practices
    SOURCE: Keim SA, “Microbial contamination of human milk purchased via the Internet.”
    URL: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24144714



Birth control

Birth control

  • 99% – Breastfeeding is 99% effective as a birth control method within the first six months of baby’s life (so long as the mother exclusively breastfeeds without pumping and has not yet had a period)
    SOURCE: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals
    URL: arhp.org/Publications-and-Resources/Patient-Resources/Fact-Sheets/Breastfeeding
  • 50% more births would be expected in developing countries where breastfeeding is high (if it were stopped)
    SOURCE: The Lancet
    URL: thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(15)01024-7/fulltext

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