How to Get Pregnant with PCOS

PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) can make it difficult for women of childbearing age to get pregnant. While it can sometimes be a struggle, conception is still possible for women with this complex endocrine disorder.

If you suffer from PCOS, here are some simple, impactful steps that you can take to increase your chances of getting a positive pregnancy test.

What is Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)?

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder that’s marked by irregular or infrequent menstrual periods 1 healthline.com . Women with PCOS tend to have higher than usual levels of the male hormones, or androgens. The syndrome typically results in the development of multiple ovarian cysts. The cysts are fluid-filled pockets located in the walls of the ovaries. They disrupt and sometimes even stop the release of eggs. 

According to the latest statistic, PCOS currently affects 1 in every 10 women of childbearing age 2 womenshealth.gov . It is one of the leading causes of infertility. Fortunately, it is a treatable condition.

What are the chances of getting pregnant with PCOS?

There’s no way to give a streamline statistic when it comes to the fertility rates of women with PCOS. After all, every women’s situation is different. A women’s hormone levels, age, weight, and BMI all play into her chance of fertility.

It’s much easier to pinpoint the success rate of particular fertility treatments and medications. For example, PCOS women that undergo IVF treatments have a 75% chance of getting pregnant. Meanwhile, roughly 50% of women that ovulate while taking Clomid end up getting pregnant. 

Always speak with your doctor before trying a particular fertility treatment.

Keep in mind that PCOS interferes with your ability to grow and release eggs. However, it cannot singlehandedly stop you from getting pregnant.

Why Treat Your PCOS?

PCOS can seriously impact a woman’s health and wellbeing. Common PCOS symptoms include 3 crh.ucsf.edu :

  • Irregular or completely absent menstrual periods
  • Weight gain
  • Thinning hair
  • Unusual or excessive hair growth on the face, chest, etc.
  • Oily or acne-covered skin
  • Fertility issues

PCOS may also result in several serious health issues, including:

  • Diabetes
  • Cardiovascular problems
  • Depression
  • Endometrial cancer

Since PCOS inhibits fertility, many women wait until they are trying to conceive before attempting to manage this illness. Keep in mind that there are also PCOS treatments for women who are not looking to get pregnant.

What Causes Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome?

Researchers have yet to pinpoint an exact cause of PCOS. However, they have found a correlation between the syndrome and excess insulin resistance, obesity, inflammation, and hormone production issues 4 nhs.uk . Researchers have also discovered that PCOS runs in families. Many health professionals suspect that it is a genetic issue. Women with PCOS have imbalanced hormones. Most have higher than usual androgen levels.

How is PCOS diagnosed?

While there is no test that you can take to diagnose your PCOS, doctors can perform various tests and talk with you about your symptoms and medical history to determine if it is PCOS that ails you.

Does PCOS cause problems during pregnancy?

Yes, in addition to making conception more difficult, PCOS can cause several pregnancy-related complications. Women with PCOS are more likely to experience miscarriages, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, and cesarean sections. The best way to prevent these circumstances is to eat healthily and exercise regularly up to and during your pregnancy.

Diet, Excercise, and Health for PCOS

Unfortunately, weight gain and obesity are proven to accelerate the effects of PCOS (5). At the same time, PCOS can accelerate weight gain and obesity. As a result, diet and exercise are some of the most crucial lifestyle changes that women can make to increase their chances of getting pregnant with PCOS.

Weight Loss

Many women with PCOS suffer from insulin resistance. Unfortunately, insulin resistance typically suppresses a woman’s metabolism. When left untreated, it can lead to weight gain and even obesity. Eventually, weight gain can cause an interruption in a woman’s ovulation.

Weight gain also impacts a woman’s ability to produce estrogen and, therefore, ovulate.

With all of that said, weight loss is a proven method when it comes time to combat menstrual disorders. If you’re looking to shed pounds, you might consider:

  • Reducing your carb intake
  • Monitoring your blood sugar levels
  • Use the glycemic index (GI) to determine the best foods for you
  • Increasing your fiber intake
  • Increasing your lean protein intake
  • Eating healthy fats
  • Limiting your portions
  • Eliminating simple carbohydrates and sugars
  • Opting for more fruits and veggies

Researchers have found that diet and exercise increase PCOS women’s chances of fertility. However, it is essential to note that positive lifestyle changes may only work when used in conjunction with proven fertility treatments (6). There is no one-size-fits-all diet for women with PCOS. Instead, women should look to eat whole foods with high nutritious value.

Get your weight and body mass index (BMI) measured by your doctor. These calculations will show you how much weight you need to lose (or gain) before you reach your ideal body composition. Additionally, have your doctor check your blood sugar levels to determine if you are at risk for developing Type 2 Diabetes.

Excercise

Exercise is another excellent way to kickstart your body’s metabolism and shed those extra pounds. Keep in mind that weight loss tends to be more difficult for women with PCOS. Studies show that exercise can improve the regularity of a woman’s ovulation by 50%. Brisk walks, jogs, weight training, and other low-impact forms are excellent options for women who are trying to conceive.

Sleep

Studies show that sleep disturbances and disorders are common in women with PCOS (7). Talk with your doctor if you are experiencing sleep interruptions, insomnia, or restlessness.

Stress

Stress is yet another factor that may put a woman at a higher risk for developing PCOS (8). Anxiety and depression rates are also higher among women with PCOS. Changes in diet and exercise may increase your endorphins, lessening the effects of anxiety and depression.

Fertility Medications

There are several prescription and over-the-counter medications that women can take to manage their PCOS symptoms and increase their fertility rate. Here are a few of the more common treatments.

Metformin

Metformin is a prescription Type 2 diabetes drug that treats polycystic ovary syndrome (9). Metformin’s key role is to manage a woman’s insulin levels. It has high rates of success when used in conjunction with diet and exercise.

Clomid

Clomid is a common fertility drug that is used to treat PCOS. It is called Serophene or clomiphene citrate (CC). It requires a prescription.

Research shows that the vast majority of Clomid interventions result in ovulation (10). This drug works by stimulating the release of certain reproductive hormones. Success rates vary depending on a woman’s age. However, women of childbearing age have a 40% likelihood of becoming pregnant after taking this drug.

Letrozole

Letrozole is a breast cancer treatment that has gained notoriety as a PCOS treatment. Letrozole suppresses a women’s estrogen levels. Over 60% of Letrozole users have reported successful ovulation. Meanwhile, 14.2% of Letrozole users have become pregnant (11). Recently, it has become a popular alternative to Clomid.

Gonadotropin Therapy

Gonadotropin therapy consists of follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH] injections. Gonadotropin is proven to induce ovulation in women with polycystic ovaries.

Intrauterine Insemination (IUI)

During intrauterine insemination (IUI), sperm is placed directly inside a woman’s uterus. This treatment increases a woman’s chance of getting pregnant. It costs less than IVF and other fertility treatments.

Birth Control

While birth control prevents pregnancy, it is a common pre-fertility treatment strategy. Combination pills help balance a woman’s levels of estrogen and testosterone. Therefore, it is not unusual for a doctor to prescribe birth control to a woman who is about to go through with IVF or IUI treatments.

Laparoscopic Ovarian Drilling (LOD)

Laparoscopic ovarian drilling (LOD) is a surgical treatment that may help some women with PCOS. During this treatment, small sections of the ovaries are damaged. Up to 50% of patients get pregnant after the procedure (12).

IVF

IVF (in-vitro fertilization) is a popular fertility treatment for women with PCOS. During IVF, a woman’s eggs are harvested from her body and fertilized. After successful fertilization, the fertilized egg, or embryo, can be transferred to the woman’s uterus. Patients then await the results of positive implantation. The success rate of IVF treatments on patients with PCOS is around 75% (13).

Natural PCOS Fertility Treatments

There are also some evidence-backed natural treatments for PCOS. The following vitamins and minerals may just put you one step closer to that positive pregnancy test.

Chromium

Chromium is a mineral that is proven to decrease fasting blood sugar and insulin levels in clomiphene citrate-resistant women with PCOS (14). One study suggests that chromium picolinate (the supplement of chromium) is just as effective as the pharmaceutical drug, metformin. With that said, this drug is not proven to change or improve women’s hormone levels.

Omega-3

Studies show that Omega-3 fatty acids reduce women’s resistance to insulin, decrease their testosterone concentrations, and increase their chances of conception (15).

Magnesium

Women with PCOS could also benefit from taking a daily dose of magnesium. Magnesium consumption is proven to lower blood pressure while increasing insulin resistance.

Folate

Folate is yet another supplement that is proven to increase a person’s insulin resistance while decreasing their cholesterol levels.

Inositol

Inositol is yet another over-the-counter supplement that may help you improve your insulin resistance.

Ovulation Calculator

Generally speaking, women can benefit from knowing their most fertile days. Using an ovulation calculator, like this one from the Office of Women’s Health, track your most fertile days. There are usually six days during your menstrual period when you can get pregnant.

Caffeine

Studies show that there are numerous benefits to caffeine consumption with PCOS. A moderate amount of coffee can stimulate your metabolism, increase your levels of SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin), and even boost your wood.

At the same time, caffeine also has a direct impact on your ability to process insulin. Moreover, some research shows that caffeine consumption decreases a woman’s chance of getting pregnant.

Wrapping Up

All women should talk with their healthcare providers before considering pregnancy. Healthcare professionals are the only individuals that are qualified to assess a woman’s fertility issues. If you suffer from irregular periods or have tried and failed to get pregnant over 12 months, there’s a possibility that you are suffering from PCOS. You may want to speak with a fertility expert to determine your best course of action. Of course, you can’t go wrong by making positive, healthy changes to your lifestyle.

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